The proximal airway of the bat Tadarida brasiliensis: a minimum entropy production design

Canals M.; Sabat P.; Veloso C.

Abstract

The bronchial tree of most mammalian lungs is a good example of an efficient distribution system whose geometry and dimensions of branched structures are important factors in determining the efficiency of respiration. Small and flying endothermic animals have high-energy requirements, requiring morphological and physiological adaptations to reduce energy loss. Here we show that Tadarida brasiliensis, a nocturnal small bat whose energy requirements are exacerbated by this small size and by their frequent exposure to high altitude, has a different morphology in the proximal airway, sustained by a wider trachea and better scaling factors, than other non-flying mammals. This design allows a great decrease of the volume specific resistance of the proximal airway and in consequence a very low entropy production during breathing, approximately 1/18 of that expected for a non-flying mammals of similar body size. © 2007 Springer-Verlag.

Más información

Título según WOS: The proximal airway of the bat Tadarida brasiliensis: a minimum entropy production design
Título según SCOPUS: The proximal airway of the bat Tadarida brasiliensis: A minimum entropy production design
Título de la Revista: JOURNAL OF COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY B-BIOCHEMICAL SYSTEMS AND ENVIRONMENTAL PHYSIOLOGY
Volumen: 178
Asunto: 3
Editorial: SPRINGER HEIDELBERG
Fecha de publicación: 2008-01-01
Página de inicio: 377
Página final: 384
Idioma: English
DOI/URL:

10.1007/s00360-007-0230-z

Identificador: 10.1007/s00360-007-0230-z
Notas: ISI, SCOPUS